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Hundley advocates
enough rest for energetic
Willson Contreras

By George Castle
Friday, January 12th, 2018

Randy Hundley knows exactly how Willson Contreras feels on the field.

Randy Hundley (center) is always a fountain of knowledge about catching. He did it again in a recent reunion of 1969 Cubs personalities. From left, WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg, Hall of Famer Fergie Jenkins, lefty pitcher Rich Nye and Cubs media relations director Chuck Shriver.

Randy Hundley (center) is always a fountain of knowledge about catching. He did it again in a recent reunion of 1969 Cubs personalities. From left, WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg, Hall of Famer Fergie Jenkins, lefty pitcher Rich Nye and Cubs media relations director Chuck Shriver.

Both Hundley, one of the most popular Cubs catchers in history, and up-and-coming catcher Contreras were both energy guys. They'd like to be in the center of things. In Hundley's case, probably too much so. He tried to offer the 1969-vintage Cubs too much of a good thing by catching in 151 games, a year after he set the big-league ironman record behind the plate with 160 games.

Hundley catching doubleheaders was like Jack Brickhouse yelling "Hey Hey!" It was second nature in summer. Over the Labor Day weekend — Friday through Monday — in 1967, the Cubs played a barbaric four consecutive doubleheaders.
STORY >>


 

Jim Thome far outdoes youthful
role-model Kingman for HOF character


By George Castle, CBM Historian
Posted Thursday, January 4th, 2018

Jim Thome's power was directly responsible for the White Sox's last postseason appearance.

Jim Thome's power was directly responsible for the White Sox's last postseason appearance.

It's not common a pro athlete far exceeds his childhood role model.

In Jim Thome's case, it's quite fortunate.

A favorite to be inducted into the 2018 Hall of Fame Class Jan. 24, the genial slugger-turned-special assistant with the White Sox grew up in Peoria admiring Cubs strongman Dave Kingman. Good thing Thome greatly exceeded both Kong's power totals intermixed with prodigious strikeouts and questionable character traits.

Kingman finished with 442 homers, 1816 strikeouts and just 608 walks. His lifetime on-base percentage was a weak .302 with a .236 average.

Thome's 612 homers were accompanied by 2,548 strikeouts. Just as strong as Kingman, he could air-condition the ballpark with anyone. However, Thome also drew 1,747 walks, amassing a .402 on-base percentage with a .276 average.

But the issue of character, a prime prerequisite for Cooperstown enshrinement, separates baseball's men from the boys.

Kingman's personal demons and family background prompted him to shun the media, not show up at his own T-shirt day at Wrigley Field in 1980, dump ice water in spring training on Daily Herald Cubs writer Don Friske and send a caged rat to Athletics beat writer Susan Fornoff.
STORY >>

Dawson back
in Cubs' fold?

Greg Maddux
'money quotes'

Lester Lancaster,
Mexican pro baseball



A multi-media celebration of Chicago's own Double Duty Radcliffe

'Double Duty' Ted Radcliffe: Chicago's own Negro League superstar

Double Duty Ted Radcliffe was Chicago's own Negro League superstar. Those who knew him and his work insist Duty would have been a star big-leaguer behind the plate and a very competent starting pitcher had the color line not been firmly entrenched in the prime of his career.

In connection with the DD Classic and as a permanent way to honor Duty, the Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting this special tribute to the great man and also assisted with the Double Duty exhibit at the DuSable Museum. On our 'Double Duty' microsite, we recount his long career with his own words, photos that show the ballplayer, the colorful personality and as a special treat, Duty's own taped recollections from WGN-TV's 1992 "Chicago American Giants" special.

STORY >>
Visit the 'Double Duty' microsite >>
Visit White Sox' Double Duty Classic >>

Jack Brickhouse: Our man
for all sports seasons

Jack Brickhouse: Our man for all seasons

Jack Brickhouse enjoyed a life of firsts. He was the first voice heard on WGN-TV when it signed on 1948. He was the first Chicago voice heard on a trans-Atlantic satellite broadcast in 1962. He called eight no-hitters, six Gale Sayers touchdowns in one game and the better part of 45 runs scored in a 1979 Cubs-Phillies contest.

The Chicago Baseball Museum pays tribute to Brickhouse in this special Jack Brickhouse microsite at a time the Cubs are honoring him with a special bobblehead day, as part of their Wrigley Field 100th anniversary celebration. The website recalls different facets of Brickhouse's life, including stories, photos from the collection of Pat Brickhouse, Jack's wife, and a wide variety of video and audio highlights from his career.

STORY >>
Visit the Jack Brickhouse microsite >>
Chicago Tribune: Cubs will honor
Jack Brickhouse Friday >>


Jerome Holtzman Library

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