Day: September 15, 2017

’67 Near Miss Sox – under-loved by South-Side fans

The '67 Sox had plenty of hype to appeal to fans via fiery manager Eddie Stanky.

The ’67 Sox had plenty of hype to appeal to fans via fiery manager Eddie Stanky.

The dilemma is never adequately explained or nailed down.

Why don’t the White Sox draw more fans?

Or, more specifically, why didn’t Sox rooters — who supposedly demand winners to spin the turnstiles — turn out in greater numbers when the team was in contention, if not entrenched in first place by large margins?

The issue without an answer carried through my coverage of the Sox in this millennium. Sox management exhibited all kinds of mental gyrations to explain why the 2000 team, cruising to an easy divisional title, had plenty of seats to sell over the Labor Day weekend. Five years later, as the World Series-bound Sox zoomed to a 15-game lead, the ballpark was not bursting with near-sellouts every night.

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Category Baseball Under Glass Blog Tags
 

’67 Sox greatest waste of stellar pitching

Cash had the most productive career of any of the home-grown hitters the Sox traded away after 1959.

Cash had the most productive career of any of the home-grown hitters the Sox traded away after 1959.

Fifty years later, the statistics still don’t lie: the White Sox had a better overall pitching staff in 1967 than the Sandy Koufax-Don Drysdale Los Angeles Dodgers of previous seasons.

“We had a bullpen and a half,” recalled then-long reliever Wilbur Wood, who’d go on to become the team’s knuckleball ace in the early 1970s, but then yielded late-inning work to closer Bob Locker, flutterball master Hoyt Wilhelm and veteran Don McMahon.

The starting Big Three of Joel Horlen (2.06 ERA) — who threw a no-hitter against the Detroit Tigers — and lefties Gary Peters and a pre-surgery Tommy John helped produce an American League-leading team ERA of 2.45, a throwback to the Dead Ball Era.

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Category Chicago Baseball History Feature Tags